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   from the issue of April 15, 2004

     
 
Senior vice chancellor candidates invited

Five candidates for the position of senior vice chancellor for academic affairs have been invited for on-campus interviews this month.

The candidates and the scheduled dates of their interviews are:

• Linda P. Brady, dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, April 26-28;

• Barbara Couture, dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Washington State University in Pullman, April 21-23;

• Richard J. Hoffmann, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UNL, April 28-30;

• Larry F. Lemanski, vice president for research and graduate studies at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, April 14-16;

• R. Craig Schnell, provost and vice president for academic affairs at North Dakota State University in Fargo. His interview dates were April 12-14.

Brady has been dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the university’s second-largest college, at North Carolina State since July 2001. A political scientist with experience in both government service and academia, she earned her bachelor’s degree at Douglass College, the women’s college of Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (1969), her master’s at Rutgers (1970) and her doctorate at Ohio State University (1974). Brady has been an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. (1973-76), and at Goucher College in Towson, Md. (1976-78). She then served nine years in the federal government in the Carter and Reagan administrations in the State and Defense departments, the last three years as an international program analyst in the office of the assistant secretary of defense. She served two years as a fellow in international security and arms control at the Carter Center of Emory University in Atlanta and taught at the Georgia Institute of Technology from January 1988 until she left for North Carolina State. She was John M. Olin distinguished of professor of national security studies at the U.S. Military Academy during a year on leave from Georgia Tech (1991-92) and in her last six years at the Atlanta school she was chair of the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs.

Couture has been dean of the Washington State College of Liberal Arts since 1998, managing 18 academic departments and programs. She earned a bachelor’s degree with high distinction from the University of Michigan (1970) and earned master and doctor of arts degrees in English language and literature (1973, 1980). She began her academic career as an assistant professor of English at Wayne State University in Detroit in 1980, was promoted to associate professor and achieved tenure in 1986 and achieved the rank of professor in 1994. At Wayne State, she also served as an associate dean for curriculum in the College of Liberal Arts (1990-91) and associate dean for metropolitan programs and summer sessions in the College of Lifelong Learning (1993-97). Couture received the Outstanding Book Award at the 2000 Conference on College Composition and Communication for Toward a Phenomenological Rhetoric: Writing, Profession and Altruism.

Hoffmann has been dean of UNL’s College of Arts and Sciences since 2001. A biologist, Hoffmann earned his bachelor’s degree with high honors at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. (1969), and his master’s (1971) and doctorate (1974) at Stanford University. After a year as postdoctoral scholar at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, he was an assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Pittsburgh in 1975. He moved on to Iowa State University as associate professor of zoology and genetics in 1980 and was promoted to professor in 1987. In his 18 years at ISU, Hoffmann served as associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (1993-97) and interim dean of the college (1997-98). A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science since 1990, Hoffmann is known for his work on the genetics of adaptation.

Lemanski has been vice president for research and graduate studies at Florida Atlantic since 2001, overseeing all aspects of research and graduate studies at the institution’s seven campuses. A biologist, he earned a bachelor’s degree with honors at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville (1966) and his master’s and doctoral degrees at Arizona State University (1968, 1971) and did four years of post-doctoral study in cell biology at the University of Pennsylvania (1971-75). He was an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco (1975-77), then spent six years at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, advancing to professor of anatomy in 1981. In 1983, he began a 14-year tenure as professor and chair of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the State University of New York Health Science Center in Syracuse. From 1997 to 2001, he was associate vice president for research at Texas A&M University in College Station, where he also had the rank of professor of medical physiology in the College of Medicine and professor of biology in the College of Science.

Schnell became vice president for academic affairs at North Dakota State in 1997 after holding the position for two years in an interim appointment. He added the title of provost in 2002. Schnell earned a bachelor of science degree in pharmacy at South Dakota State University (1965) and earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in pharmacology/toxicology at Purdue University (1967, 1969). He served in the U.S. Army as chief of toxicology at Fort Baker in California (1969-71) and was an assistant professor of pharmacology at Washington State for one year before returning to Purdue in the same capacity. He became associate professor of pharmacology with tenure at Purdue in 1975, then became professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology in the College of Pharmacy at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha in 1979. Schnell moved to North Dakota State in 1985 as dean of graduate studies and research.

The senior vice chancellor for academic affairs is the chief academic officer for the campus and is second to the chancellor in the university’s organizational chart. The office provides leadership and support for academic programs.

UNL seeks a replacement for Richard C. Edwards. David B. Brinkerhoff is interim senior vice chancellor for academic affairs.


GO TO: ISSUE OF APRIL 15

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